Working near our networks

We work with property owners, developers, engineers, architects and others who want to carry out work on or near drinking water, wastewater and stormwater network pipes, manholes (entry points), fire hydrants and other assets.  

Although the rules for working with or near these services are similar within each council area, important differences exist. So, you must first identify in which council (Wellington, Hutt City, Upper Hutt, Porirua) your proposed project is located.

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Locating water, stormwater and wastewater networks

Council owned (public) networks (i.e. manholes, pipes, fire hydrants) can be located within both public land (i.e. roadways and berms) and private land.   Read more

Connecting to the networks

If you are constructing a new house or building, undertaking a subdivision or changing the use of a building (such as from residential to commercial) then you may need to connect new private drinking water, wastewater and stormwater pipes to or from the public network.   Read more

Building over or next to the network

Sometimes when you are considering new works you could be proposing positioning structures (buildings, retaining walls, extra fill) close to or over the existing drinking water, wastewater or stormwater networks which can be found within private properties. Building over or near a pipeline can result in damage to the pipe or the property. It can also restrict future options for maintenance and renewal of the pipeline.   Read more

Adjusting, upgrading or extending

If you are constructing a new house/building, or undertaking a subdivision it may be necessary to adjust, upgrade or extend the existing drinking water, wastewater or stormwater networks to be able to make room within the site, allow building alongside and or provide service to properties.   Read more

Stormwater neutrality and wastewater control

Each section of the existing three waters networks was designed and built to service expected levels of development and the standards of the time they were built.   Read more

Water Sensitive Design

Water sensitive design (WSD) is an inter-disciplinary design approach, which considers stormwater management in parallel with the ecology of a site, best practice urban design, and community values. WSD aspires to ensure multiple public benefits from stormwater management and to develop a unique ‘sense of place’ for our communities. It also seeks to deliver low risk and better return on investment for land developers.   Read more